Vermentino di Sardegna DOC, Part 1

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Vermentino di Sardegna DOC

Vermentino di Sardegna DOC, Part 1 Vermentino di Sardegna comes from the island of wind and wine. Sardegna is roughly the size of Wales and the second biggest of all the Mediterranean islands. Being there feels like it’s an entire continent, such are the varying landscapes. Once upon a time, Sardinian Vermentino was mostly quaffing wine, cheap and cheerful. However, …

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Sella & Mosca, a unique winery in Sardegna

Paul Howard Articles, Blog, Italy, Travel, Wine Business 2 Comments

Sella & Mosca

Sella & Mosca, a unique winery in Sardegna Erminio Sella and Edgardo Mosca founded Sella & Mosca in 1890. They came from Piemonte, transforming a poor sheep-farming area into an extraordinary vinous landscape. These rich men were also amateur Egyptologists. It’s commemorated in the winery logo, showing ancient Egyptians pressing grapes, from the tomb of Mereruka in Saqqara. The origins of …

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Colonnara – you might say VerdichiAMO!

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LOGO Colonnara, Marche

Colonnara – you might say VerdichiAMO! Colonnara is a 110-member co-operative winery located in the heart of the Verdicchio Castelli di Jesi DOC, in Cupramontana. It’s some 40km inland from the city of Ancona and 20km from the town of Jesi. Colonnara was established in 1959 by 19 growers; it now makes many different wines from around the March; there …

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The Verdicchio of the Castles of Jesi

Paul Howard Articles, Blog, Italy, Wine Reviews 2 Comments

Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi

The Verdicchio of the Castles of Jesi In my first article on Verdicchio, (Part 1: Matelica, fifty shades of green), I mentioned that the Marche region of central Italy is where the best Verdicchio grows. Here it proves to be one of Italy’s finest native white grapes, capable of outstanding longevity. This Part two is about Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi, Matelica’s more …

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Fifty Shades of Green: Verdicchio di Matelica

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Produttori del Verdicchio di Matelica

Fifty Shades of Green: Verdicchio di Matelica The Marche in central Italy is where the Verdicchio grape shows that it’s one of Italy’s finest native white grapes. As well as making highly distinctive and characterful wines, it’s also versatile. It makes a range of wine styles; from fizz through to sweet wines. However, the best examples are the dry still …

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Le Mortelle, a rising star in the Maremma

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Antinori Le Mortelle

Le Mortelle, a rising star in the Maremma Le Mortelle is one of Antinori’s more recent ventures, a new organic wine estate created in Tuscany’s coastal Maremma. Here’s a progress report on this rising star. The Antinori family has been in the wine business for over six hundred years, documenting this back to 1385, across 26 generations. Has anyone done …

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Etna terroir, the Burgundy of the Mediterranean – the Lava Lout Returns, Part 2 of 2

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Etna terroir

Etna terroir, the Burgundy of the Mediterranean – the Lava Lout Returns, Part 2 of 2 The Etna Terroir Part 1 of this article described how a Sicilian volcano bestows natural gifts to create the Etna terroir. But Etna isn’t one terroir; there are many variations. Welcome to the Burgundy of the Mediterranean. Etna’s volcanic soils are free draining, and low …

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Etna, or why I’m a Lava Lout – Part 1 of 2

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Etna smouldering

Etna, or why I’m a Lava Lout – Part 1 of 2 It’s how the Earth was made. At 3,343 metres (10,968 feet), Mount Etna (Mongibello) spits, snarls and smokes. All around is ash, black as death. Above us, the summit has four active craters, caked with yellow sulphur. Etna erupts almost continuously. As we climb to 3,050 metres, it’s …

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